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Visual Arts


Work by Trinh Mai

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Visual Arts


Work by Trinh Mai

Visual Arts

Proposal for Artist-in-Residence Program 2015

The DVAN Artist-in-Residence Program’s mission is to support diasporic Vietnamese artists in the development of their visual art portfolios, including, but not limited to painting, drawing, installation, mixed media, photography, sculpture, and new media. This program is predicated on the belief that artists and organizations, working in creative and new ways, can re-imagine new ways of engaging the community during the process of developing visual art. This initiative encourages artists to engage with the community, both on and off-site, through receptions, gallery tours, art talks in the academy, and developing work on-site as a means to initiate conversations regarding the creative process.

These residencies will promote deeper, meaningful, and long-lasting partnerships, and open up conversation between organizations, universities, and artists, while providing substantial resources to artists, and serving the community at large. Through public involvement, artists are encouraged to be creative in thinking about art, its function in society, its value, and how it serves the community in imaginative ways.

Julie Thi Underhill, Artist-in-Residence, 2015

Julie Thi Underhill, Artist-in-Residence, 2015


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Current Exhibition: Love in the Time of War


Current Exhibition: Love in the Time of War


The Diasporic Vietnamese Artists Network (DVAN) is proud to be a sponsor of Love in the Time of War, an exhibition presented by UC Santa Barbara and SF Camerawork featuring emerging and established transnational artists with ties to Southeast Asia, Europe, the U.S., and in-between. Curated by Việt Lê and Jennifer Vanderpool, the exhibition will be on view at UC Santa Barbara Glass Box Gallery from August 4 - 25, 2016 and at SF Camerawork from September 1 - October 15, 2016. A website featuring special online-only artist projects and a full-color print catalogue accompanies the show: http://loveinthetimeofwar.com 

Love in the Time of War connects with the fortieth anniversary of the military engagements in Southeast Asia (2015) and current wars overseas and on U.S. streets. The exhibition explores the relationship between war and personal intimacy, between politics and the body and the body politic. The artists involved embody the contradictions of engaging love—its contingency and urgency— in a time of eternal wars. Through their transnational perspectives, these artists facilitate a disquieting but necessary conversation on personal intimacies and political violence. 

For more information, please visit:

http://loveinthetimeofwar.com 

 http://www.sfcamerawork.org/love-in-the-time-of-war

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Program Structure


Work by Anh Bui

Program Structure


Work by Anh Bui

Program Structure

 The DVAN's Artist-in-Residency program will grant awards to 3 artists each year, each artist offered a 3-month period of stay. A group show will take place during the 4th period of the program and will include one piece created from each of the resident artists during that year’s program, alongside a select group of artists which will be juried by a DVAN panel.

Applications will be reviewed by peer panels. Accepted artists will receive an award in addition to honorariums for University art talks and on-site gallery talks. Residencies will support the creation of new work, the development of existing work, and creative time for artists. Panels will not award partial grants or change grant request amounts.

The program requires that artists spend a significant time on site during their 4-month duration of their residency. The program strongly encourages sensitivity to artists’ needs and strategic structure of the residency in planning the specific residency calendar. The residency encourages the creation of new work, which can include completing works in progress.

The most competitive applicants will have taken significant time to discuss in advance of the application what their perceptions, needs, questions, and possible areas of exploration might be; and will have arrived at a clearly delineated sense of responsibilities and timelines.

Based on lessons learned, either in process or in the residencies themselves, particular review criteria, residency requirements, and eligibility issues may change as the program evolves in an attempt to be maximally responsive to field needs.

Please contact DVAN for more information. 

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Troubling borders


An Anthology of Art and Literature by Southeast Asian Women in the Diaspora

Photo by Hong-An Truong

Troubling borders


An Anthology of Art and Literature by Southeast Asian Women in the Diaspora

Photo by Hong-An Truong

DVAN published Troubling Borders featuring work by women of Cambodian, Laotian, Vietnamese, Thai and Filipina descent, as well as women from minority groups such as the ethnic Chinese and Indians in Southeast Asia, and the often stateless Mien, Hmong, and Cham in many regions of the world. There are hundreds of thousands of women of Southeast Asian descent in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and other parts of the world. As an incredibly diverse group, our voices make visible the ruptures caused by colonization, wars, globalization, and militarization. Our stories are vital and varied. They provide a sharp contrast to normative narratives and ideologies that have historically been constructed by the West and the nation-states of Southeast Asia. Too often Southeast Asian women are represented as exotic sex symbols and dragon ladies, prostitutes and “bar girls” in movies and the media. By publishing these works and pushing the boundaries of literature and art, we want to demonstrate the global connections that bring such disparate groups of women together. We hope that this collection will inspire, empower and unify future generations of Southeast Asian women of the diaspora through the arts.

Troubling Borders... give[s] recognition to the voices of those who have been nearly invisible in academic and arts circles, as well as a testament to the courage of these women to share their experiences.
— Kriti Bajaj
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History


Visual Art Programs

History


Visual Art Programs

Although the larger Bay Area is home to nearly 200,000 people of Vietnamese origin, there are very few arts and culture programs that address the experiences and needs of this community. The lack of access to arts that confront the lingering pain of broken families, communities and social ties as a result of war and migration delay the healing process in the community that could foster positive changes and the relationship to other communities and society. DVAN addresses this lack through organizing Visual Arts programs accompanied with lectures and workshops will allow the community to benefit from the rich body of cultural works which address their experiences and history.

2012-2014

DVAN organized a 2 weeks long summer program for middle and high school youth of Southeast Asian descent from the Tenderloin neighbourhood. Responding to the evaluation from our first youth program in 2011, the summer program was an intensive course, which provided students with the artistic tools in visual arts, creative writing, and performing arts to critically analyse their relationship to the community, its history and the society at large. Each day was divided into two sessions. Vietnamese American and artists of color in the Bay Area led morning classes about art and its impact on communities and the society. In the afternoon, students worked in groups to produce their own artworks. The program encompassed two field trips to expose the students to other Southeast Asian communities in San Francisco. The program hosted a final exhibition where the students presented their own artworks and chapbook to their families and community.


2011

DVAN's Youth Group Program orginated with three teaching artists (Khoi Nguyen, Danny Nguyen, and Anhvu Buchanan) collaborating the Vietnamese Youth Development Center in the L.I.F.E (Leadership, Identity, Future, and Empowerment) Skills program. Since September 2011, the teaching artists represented DVAN by facilitating workshops alongside VYDC staff. These workshops engaged participants to critically and creatively examine their understanding of community, family/social life, communication skills, health and wellness, and their own personal experiences. L.I.F.E. Skills’ graduated a class of 10 youth participants, ages 16-21, most of whom are Southeast Asian immigrants living in San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood, home to the city’s Vietnamese community.

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Artist Interviews


Photo: Work by Reanne Estrada

Sweeney Art Gallery--"Troubling Borders: Southeast Asian Women in the Diaspora"

Artist Interviews


Photo: Work by Reanne Estrada

Sweeney Art Gallery--"Troubling Borders: Southeast Asian Women in the Diaspora"

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Artist Bios


Click "see all" for our complete list of artists

Artist Bios


Click "see all" for our complete list of artists